Archive for November, 2013

C4W Member Profile: Sarah McLeod

November 18, 2013

rsz_1dscn4048What is your profession and how long have you been in that profession?
Independent Insurance Agent. 6 months

What do you enjoy doing outside of your career?  

Being outdoors, spending time with husband, family, friends, and my two dogs (Raleigh and Bronco), playing and watching sports, sewing/redecorating my house, reading, thrift shopping!

How long have you been a member of the Center for Women?

Brand New Member

What inspired you to become a member?

I just moved back to Charleston and wanted to meet other professional women in the area!

What kind of impact has the Center for Women had on you?

It has been great so far and I have been inspired to work harder and help more people!

How has living day-to-day as a woman affected you?

I embrace being a woman and try to use my knowledge to succeed.

What woman (living or past) do you find most inspiring?

Ellen DeGeneres for her philanthropies and for the ability to laugh that she brings to so many people.

If you could have one super power what would it be?

To go invisible!

What kind of message would you like to send out to women who are trying to succeed in today’s economy?

Never give up, smile, and hold your head high.  When bad days come or the road gets rough always remember this too shall pass!

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Women from History: The Grimke Sisters

November 7, 2013
Sarah___Angelina_Grimke

Angelina and Sarah Grimke

Some of the first advocates of women’s rights and the abolition of slavery were two sisters from Charleston, South Carolina, Sarah Grimke (1792-1873) and Angelina Grimke (1805-1879). The Grimke sisters were “raised in the cradle of slavery” and were the daughters of a wealthy plantation owner, Judge John Fauchereaud Grimke. Even though the girls grew up with the privilege and comfort of their aristocratic life, they grew to despise the institutions they were so much a part of: slavery and patriarchal societies that oppress women. As young girls, the sisters taught their slaves to read, something that was highly punishable not only on the plantations, but by law.

Sarah accompanied her father to Philadelphia in 1819, and it was there that she encountered the Society of Friends, or Quakers. The Quaker’s view on equality of the sexes and antislavery resonated with Sarah, and she eventually converted to Quakerism, and Angelina later on. The Grimke sisters moved to Philadelphia, and that move gave them the motivation and confidence to know, that as women, they could make a difference and have their voices heard.

appeal to the christian women

A copy of Angelina Grimke’s pamphlet, “Appeal to the Christian Women of the South”

Angelina published a pamphlet called “Appeal to the Christian Women of the South”. This document was directed at Southern, white women, and it was a call to arms to help end the institution of slavery. The pamphlet was burned and criticized in many areas of the South in opposition to the Grimke sisters’ message. Sarah and Angelina began a speaking tour of over 67 cities, mostly in the North, which was “unheard of women of the time… Angelina’s last speech of the tour, to the Massachusetts Legislature, made her the first woman in American history to speak in front of a legislative body”. Sarah and Angelina’s involvement and fervor on the subjects of abolition and  women’s right lead to a lot of “condemnation from religious leaders and traditionalists who did not believe that it was a woman’s place to speak in public”.

These groundbreaking women helped pave the way for future abolitionist and women’s rights activism. They broke from their privileged, plantation life and linked the struggles of women and slaves in order to create the hope for an equal and progressive future, free of oppression.

Sources:

http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/angelina-grimke.html

http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/ww/grimke.html

C4W Member Profile: Christina Mikolajcik-Edles

November 6, 2013

christinaWhat is your profession?

Esthetician, Master Sugarist, Business Owner

What do you enjoy doing outside of your career?
Traveling, driving my car, organizing things, thinking, quiet, creating a good meal, yoga, making life an adventure

How long have you been a member of the Center for Women?
Brand New

What inspired you to become a member?
To support a great organization, connect, encourage other women and to find other women to appreciate

What kind of impact has the Center for Women had on you?
We’re brand new but already see the benefit of connecting with like-minded women in our community

How has living day-to-day as a woman affected you?
It has given me an immense appreciation for the challenges women faced many years before me and what they accomplished in the face of adversity. “The picture” looks very different now but unfortunately there are still major stumbling blocks, particularly the negative social stigma regarding women in professional roles. I like to challenge that stigma with the strength that comes from success.

What kind of message would you like to send out to women who are trying to succeed in today’s economy?

If something doesn’t work I don’t consider it a failure I simply begin looking for another way to accomplish the task. Think of what a defeatist might do and do the opposite. Find a mentor and keep a list of things that inspire you. Don’t make your primary goal making money, make it about establishing and maintaining opportunities and connections—the money will come.  Do what you love for a living. Then it is not just work. Ask for help when you need it.  Think before reacting. Work with compassion and without presumption. Some of the most intense struggles of my life have blossomed into beautiful gardens and blessings.

How can people connect with you?

Walk at a fast pace beside me.  To find out where I’ll be, email me at Christina@mysweet185.com


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